Mixed Media Artist

Posts tagged “artist

Diptych Portrait

Harper.sm

Cashsm

Harper-And-Cash

These 10″x20″ portraits work together and by themselves giving you the freedom for each child to have their own portrait when they are grown.

Portraits start at $500. (currently a 4 month waiting list to start a portrait).

On completion of  the portrait, prints can be made for family members so everyone can enjoy the painting of your child.

maria@mariapacewynters.com

780-604-7523

 


Evening Dreamer

Evening-Dreamer

9″x12″ mixed media painting on wood. The sides are 1.5″ deep and are painted red.

This painting is available HERE

The world needs dreamers and the world needs doers. But above all, the world needs dreamers who do.

 


Light My Way

Light-My-Way

9″x12″ mixed media painting on wood. The sides are red and are 1.5″ deep.

This painting is available HERE

It’s funny where inspiration comes from.  I was at a concert the other day and the band had set up the stage with various lamps. One lamp looked like a globe or orb and I couldn’t stop looking at it. They had set their water bottle in front of it and it almost looked like a figure holding a glowing orb above their head.  It made me think of my warrior of the light and I was inspired to paint this one.  I don’t know if I will go on to paint another but my husband quickly painted out “see it is good for you to go out!” (hermit that I am).

It is so important as an artists to be open for inspiration to make an appearance.  My mantra is always ‘inspiration finds us when we are working’ and this is true.  If we aren’t coming to the page/canvas on a regular basis, it makes it hard to actually manifest our inspiration BUT staring at the page/canvas day in and day out is NOT going to make that happen. Once again, as in most things in life, it is finding that perfect balance that is vital.

“I will love the light for it shows me the way, yet I will endure the darkness for it shows me the stars.”
― Og Mandino


Botanical Camouflage

Botanical-Camouflage

12″x36″ mixed media painting on wood. The sides are red and are 1.5″ deep.

This painting is available HERE

I first thought of the idea for this painting  a little while back when I was braiding my 10 year old’s hair. She requested that I give her one braid instead of two.  It dawned on me that she felt that one braid was more grown up than two braids and  since that day, she wears one braid. I wanted to paint her in braids,  older that she is now. Hanging on, I guess,  to this part of her as a little girl.

When I started the actual painting, the word camouflage keep circling me head. I had this one scrap of origami paper that was black with brightly coloured flowers and it reminded me of a botanical  with a black background.  I have been noticing this a lot in fashion, I think inspired by Downton Abbey and have wanted to use it in a painting.   I was thinking about how teenagers never like to be singled out but at the same time are exploring their individualism. Her botanical dress is camouflaged by the botanical background she blends in  to it but also  emerges from it.  She is figuring out who she is. It is on her terms when she decides to become the background  or when she wants to stand apart from it.  It is so important for it to be on her terms. This is not easy for a control freak like myself and I must remind myself daily to stand back (but only at arms length  because she does still reachs for me.)

The only thing is, her limbs are getting so long  that I seem to be moving farther and farther away at a faster pace than I’d like.

My heart is aching a little as I write this.

 

 


Blue Butterfly

Blue-Butterfly

This is a 4″x13″ mixed media painting on paper. There is a .25″ border and will need to matted and framed by you.

This painting is available HERE or directly from the artist maria@mariapacewynters.com


Art Right Now

Every child is an artist. The problem is how to remain an artist once he grows up.
Pablo Picasso

When I was a little girl I would do art any chance I could get. I loved to be creative and was always encouraged by my Mum. It was fun. I enjoyed doing it. In fact, there was nothing I liked better. It was never a chore! It was never dull.

So, what happened? When I was a teenager I romanticised about a lot of things: Marriage, children, getting older.Visions of Picasso danced in my head. Like Picasso before me, I saw my future self eating dinner and then taking my fish bones and making a clay relief. I would have a bohemian house with piles of art and reference books on the dining room table. I would paint along side of my toddler. Look at us painting together for hours at a time. I won’t go as far as to say I imagined myself wearing a striped black and white t- shirt and shorts but I will say that I was totally out of touch with reality. First of all, toddlers require constant help when they do art, and their attention span is all of oh, lets say, 15 minutes. If you are lucky. Also, I can’t stand stuff all over the place, let alone my dining room table. I need that table to feed my kids and I don’t want their grubby little fingers all over my good books! Not to mention that I don’t even like fish very much, let alone a whole fish with bones.

I guess as I got older so much stuff got in the way of the pure process of creation. I had a constant dialogue going through my brain. Is it good enough? Who will like this? Is it too commercial or illustrative? or not enough? Is the palette to cold? Too dark? Too muddy? How could I tap into the pureness of what I was doing if the whole time I was doing it my head was questioning whether I should be doing it all. I don’t know who initially put these questions in my head. College, University, people of influence all played a part. Life isn’t the way I imagined it. The fun in art definitely was no longer part of my process. I no longer felt excited to create. It was just so much pressure: to create art that everybody likes is really hard.

Now, it has come full circle and as a Mother I watch my girls create and I am inspired by them. They don’t worry about the outcome. They just enjoy the act of making something. Anything. When it is done, it is done, and they move on to the next thing. They don’t dwell on it. It is about the process not the product. Sure we all want to create art that we like, and that other people like too, but if that is all we focus on it becomes a chore and where is the fun in that? It is so nice not to be in that angst ridden part of my life. At forty, it is so great to be able to reassociate art with fun, and know I can still learn new stuff even if it is stuff I knew at the age of three.

http://www.mariapacewynters.com